« Back

Making a New Years Resolutions for Your Dog Part 2

07/01/2019 - Welcome to Best Behaviour Dog Training

Welcome to the second part of our 2-part blog on new years resolutions that will help you and your dog. The first part of our blog was full of suggestions for improving physical fitness and mental health (mainly for your dog but humans will probably benefit too).

In part two, we’re looking at how exercising doggy social skills can improve life for humans and canines alike. We’re also discussing problem behaviours and how you can make this year the one when those bad habits get banished.

Read the first part of our blog Making a New Years Resolutions for Your Dog

Canine Social Skills
Could you imagine living alone on an island and having no contact with any other human – ever. Not even Facebook? Sometimes it’s good to retreat for a while but wellbeing depends to a certain extent on positive interactions with other people. 

Ditto for dogs. Dogs need to socialise with other dogs. They need to be able to express the natural behaviours that are hardwired into their psyche. Just as a human artist needs to paint, a dog needs to sniff backsides and do other dog stuff.

But what if your dog is not sure how to behave around other dogs? Perhaps he’s too enthusiastic in his approach and gets nipped? Perhaps he’s shy or afraid and can’t relax if other dogs are nearby. Maybe he seems aggressive towards other dogs and that restricts his walks.

Most dogs need regular practice at meeting and interacting with their own kind and there’s no better place to provide that practice than a dog training class or workshop. It’s a controlled, safe environment, so you don’t have to worry that anyone will get hurt. And you’ll have qualified trainers on hand to help you to help your dog.

Your new year’s resolution could be to Sign up for a dog training class today

Getting rid of bad habits and problem behaviours
What does your dog do that really affects your relationship with him?

  • Jumps on visitors
  • Barks too much whilst travelling in the car
  • Chews furniture
  • Is rude to the vet
  • Pulls on the lead
  • Lunges at cars or bicycles
  • Grumbles at other dogs or at people
  • Chases cats
  • Steals food from your plate

Difficult doggy behaviour is not uncommon, after all we’re asking dogs to live human-style and they don’t automatically have the ability to do that. They need to be trained. Challenging behaviour can manifest itself in any dog. Regardless of breed, background, age or temperament. And it almost never resolves itself without training or lifestyle tweaks.

Reading about canine behaviour on the internet and in books is great. But training a real dog in real life is another matter entirely. Articles online and in magazines can be helpful and inspirational but the advice may be outdated, or based on opinion and not science. It certainly won’t be tailored to you and your dog. That just leads to further despair.

One question. Could you have learned how to drive a car just by reading a book? No, of course not. You needed practice with guidance from someone you with the right skills and experience? When you are living with a difficult dog, there’s no substitute for working with a dog trainer who “gets” what your dog is really like and can guide you through the retraining process.

The dog trainers at Best Behaviour Dog Training have eons of experience of helping despairing dog owners to  correct problem behaviour and shape their pets into loyal and trustworthy companions. Check out some of the stories on our facebook page to discover what other dog owners have achieved with our help.

Find out about Dog Training Classes in Suffolk
Get help to correct problem behaviour

You may also like
Winter warmers – our pick of dog coats to wear on those new year resolution type walks

Part 1 of our New Year’s Resolution for your dog blog all about nurturing your dog’s physical and mental health

Top